Publications

Selected scientific publications on diving medicine and physiology.

2016 Dec 1
Do Environmental Conditions Contribute to Narcosis Onset and Symptom Severity?
Lafère P, Balestra C, Hemelryck W, Guerrero F, Germonpré P.

Although many factors contributing to inert gas narcosis onset and severity have been put forward, the available evidence is not particularly strong. Using objective criteria, we have assessed brain impairment associated with narcosis under various environmental diving conditions...

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2016 Oct 24
Response: Commentary: Correlation between Patent Foramen Ovale, Cerebral “Lesions” and Neuropsychometric Testing in Experienced Sports Divers: Does Diving Damage the Brain?
Balestra C., Germonpré P.

Nutritional antioxidants have been proposed as an expedient strategy to counter the potentially deleterious effects of scuba diving on endothelial function, flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and heart function. Sixteen volunteers performing a single standard dive (20 min at 33 m) according to US Navy diving procedures were randomly assigned to two groups: one was administered with two doses of 200 mg of an anthocyanins (AC)-rich extract from red oranges, 12 and 4 h before diving. Anthocyanins supplementation significantly modulated the effects of diving on haematocrit, body water distribution and FMD.

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2016 Sep 5
A red orange extract modulates the vascular response to a recreational dive: a pilot study on the effect of anthocyanins on the physiological consequences of scuba diving.
Balestra C, Cimino F, Theunissen S, Snoeck T, Provyn S, Canali R, Bonina A, Virgili F.

Nutritional antioxidants have been proposed as an expedient strategy to counter the potentially deleterious effects of scuba diving on endothelial function, flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and heart function...

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2016 Aug 1
Detection of venous gas emboli after repetitive breath hold dives “Case report”
Cialoni D., Pieri M., Giunchi G., Sponsiello N., Lanzone A.M., Torcello L., Boaretto G. and Marroni A.

Introduction: Neurological symptoms after breathhold (BH) diving are often referred to as "Taravana" and considered a form of decompression sickness. However, the presence of "high" gas embolism after BH diving has never been clearly shown. This study showed high bubble formation after BH diving. Materials and methods: We performed transthoracic echocardiography on a 53-year-old male spearfishing diver (180 cm; 80 kg; BMI 24.7) 15 minutes before diving and at 15-minute intervals for 90 minutes after diving in a 42-meter-deep pool. Number of dives, bottom time and surface intervals were freely determined by the diver. Dive profiles were digitally recorded for depth, time and surface interval, using a freediving computer. Relative surface interval (surface interval/diving time) and gradient factor were calculated.

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2016 Jun 15
Commentaries on Viewpoint: Why predominantly neurological DCS in breath-hold divers?
Balestra C.

IPAVA RECRUITMENT CAN'T BE RESPONSIBLE FOR DECOMPRESSION SICKNESS WITHOUT EVIDENCE OF ARTERIALIZED MICROBUBBLES!

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