Wetenschappelijke artikelen
Geselecteerde wetenschappelijke artikelen over duikgeneeskunde en -fysiologie
2020 mrt 1
Field Study of Anthropomorphic and Muscle Performance Changes Among Elite Skippers Following a Transoceanic Race
Pierre Lafère, Yann Gatzoff, François Guerrero, Steven Provyn, Costantino Balestra

Background: Ocean racing has become increasingly demanding, both physically and psychologically. The aim of the study was to assess global changes after a transoceanic race. Materials and methods: Eight male sailors were evaluated pre- and post-race through anthropometric measurements (weight, skinfold, girth at different level and estimated body fat percentage), multifrequency tetrapolar bioelectrical impedance, muscular performance, visual analogic scale for perceived fatigue and Critical Flicker Fusion Frequencies for cerebral arousal.

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2020 dec 1
First impressions: Use of the Azoth Systems O'Dive subclavian bubble monitor on a liveaboard dive vessel
Germonpre P, Van der Eecken P, Van Renterghem E, Germonpre FL & Balestra C.

Introduction: The Azoth Systems O'Dive bubble monitor is marketed at recreational and professional divers as a tool to improve personal diving decompression safety. We report the use of this tool during a 12-day dive trip aboard a liveaboard vessel. Methods: Six divers were consistently monitored according to the user manual of the O'Dive system. Data were synchronised with the Azoth server whenever possible (depending on cell phone data signal).

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2014 okt 1
Flying after diving: in-flight echocardiography after a scuba diving week
Cialoni D, Pieri M, Balestra C, Marroni A.

INTRODUCTION: Flying after diving may increase decompression sickness risk (DCS), but strong evidence indicating minimum preflight surface intervals (PFSI) is missing. METHODS: On return flights after a diving week on a live-aboard, 32 divers were examined by in-flight echocardiography with the following protocol: 1) outgoing flight, no previous dive; 2) during the diving week; 3) before the return flight after a 24-h PFSI; and 4) during the return flight. RESULTS: All divers completed similar multiple repetitive dives during the diving week. All dives were equivalent as to inert gas load and gradient factor upon surfacing. No bubbles in the right heart were found in any diver during the outgoing flight or at the preflight control after a 24-h PFSI following the diving week. A significant increase in the number and grade of bubbles was observed during the return flight. However, bubbles were only observed in 6 of the 32 divers. These six divers were the same ones who developed bubbles after every dive. CONCLUSIONS: Having observed a 24-h preflight interval, the majority of divers did not develop bubbles during altitude exposure; however, it is intriguing to note that the same subjects who developed significant amounts of bubbles after every dive showed equally significant bubble grades during in-flight echocardiography notwithstanding a correct PFSI. This indicates a possible higher susceptibility to bubble formation in certain individuals, who may need longer PFSI before altitude exposure after scuba diving.

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2015 mrt 1
Flying after diving: should recommendations be reviewed? In-flight echocardiographic study in bubble-prone and bubble-resistant divers.
Cialoni D, Pieri M, Balestra C, Marroni A.

INTRODUCTION: Inert gas accumulated after multiple recreational dives can generate tissue supersaturation and bubble formation when ambient pressure decreases. We hypothesized that this could happen even if divers respected the currently recommended 24-hour pre-flight surface interval (PFSI)...

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2013 sep 1
Functional comparison between critical flicker fusion frequency and simple cognitive tests in subjects breathing air or oxygen in normobaria
Hemelryck W, Rozloznik M, Germonpré P, Balestra C, Lafère P.

Measurement of inert gas narcosis and its degree is difficult during operational circumstances, hence the need for a reliable, reproducible and adaptable tool. Although being an indirect measure of brain function, if reliable, critical flicker fusion frequency (CFFF) could address this need and be used for longitudinal studies on cortical arousal in humans...

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