Wetenschappelijke artikelen
Geselecteerde wetenschappelijke artikelen over duikgeneeskunde en -fysiologie
2004 feb 1
Scuba diving can induce stress of the temporomandibular joint leading to headache
Balestra C., Germonpré P., Marroni A., Snoeck T.

In ordinary recreational scuba diving, many anatomical parts can be involved in disorders of cranial regions: ears and eyes are involved but also sinuses. Dental problems are generally involved in barotraumas because of bad dental fillings or other matters of interest to the general dental practitioner.

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2010 jan 1
The ‘normobaric oxygen paradox’: a simple way to induce endogenous erythropoietin production and concomitantly raise hemoglobin levels in anemic patients.
Balestra C., Germonpré P., Lafere P., Ciccarella Y., Van Der Linden P.

The ‘normobaric oxygen paradox’: a simple way to induce endogenous erythropoietin production and concomitantly raise hemoglobin levels in anemic patients.

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2013 mrt 1
The ‘normobaric oxygen paradox’: another potential way to use oxygen. CME activity 2013/1.
Balestra C

The 'normobaric oxygen paradox': Another potential way to use oxygen.

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2014 dec 1
The Science of Diving
Balestra C & Germonpre P.

Decompression illnesses (DCI), or as they are called more scientifically: dysbaric disorders, represent a complex spectrum of pathophysiological conditions with a wide variety of signs and symptoms related to dissolved gas and its subsequent phase change.1,2 Any significant organic or functional dysfunction in individuals who have recently been exposed to a reduction in environmental pressure (i.e., decompression) must be considered as possibly being caused by DCI until proven otherwise.

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2017 feb 23
Environment-induced pulmonary oedema in healthy individuals
Marabotti C., Cialoni D., Pingitore A.

Infrequently, healthy individuals can develop acute pulmonary oedema when exposed to an extreme or unusual environment (ie, deep dives or high altitudes), especially during physical exertion. High-altitude pulmonary oedema (HAPO) has been reported in 0·5–7·0% of individuals who climb to altitudes higher than 4000 m (according to ascent speed), whereas swimming-induced pulmonary oedema (SIPO) has been reported in a different proportion of individuals engaged in aquatic activities.

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