Tieteellisiä julkaisuja
Valikoituja tieteellisiä julkaisuja sukelluslääketieteestä ja -fysiologiasta.
2013 kesäkuuta 6
Oxidative stress in breath-hold divers after repetitive dives
Theunissen S, Sponsiello N, Rozloznik M, Germonpré P, Guerrero F, Cialoni D, Balestra C.

INTRODUCTION: Hyperoxia causes oxidative stress. Breath-hold diving is associated with transient hyperoxia followed by hypoxia and a build-up of carbon dioxide (CO₂), chest-wall compression and significant haemodynamic changes. This study analyses variations in plasma oxidative stress markers after a series of repetitive breath-hold dives. METHODS: Thirteen breath-hold divers were asked to perform repetitive breath-hold dives to 20 metres' depth to a cumulative breath-hold time of approximately 20 minutes over an hour in the open sea. Plasma nitric oxide (NO), peroxinitrites (ONOO⁻) and thiols (R-SH) were measured before and after the dive sequence. RESULTS: Circulating NO significantly increased after successive breath-hold dives (169.1 ± 58.26% of pre-dive values; P = 0.0002). Peroxinitrites doubled after the dives (207.2 ± 78.31% of pre-dive values; P = 0.0012). Thiols were significantly reduced (69.88 ± 19.23% of pre-dive values; P = 0.0002). CONCLUSION: NO may be produced by physical effort during breath-hold diving. Physical exercise, the transient hyperoxia followed by hypoxia and CO₂ accumulation would all contribute to the increased levels of superoxide anions (O₂²⁻). Since interaction of O₂²⁻ with NO forms ONOO⁻, this reaction is favoured and the production of thiol groups is reduced. Oxidative stress is, thus, present in breath-hold diving.

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2021 lokakuuta 25
Oxygen: A Stimulus, Not "Only" a Drug
Balestra C & Kot J.

Depending on the oxygen partial pressure in a tissue, the therapeutic effect of oxygenation can vary from simple substance substitution up to hyperbaric oxygenation when breathing hyperbaric oxygen at 2.5–3.0 ATA. Surprisingly, new data showed that it is not only the oxygen supply that matters as even a minimal increase in the partial pressure of oxygen is efficient in triggering cellular reactions by eliciting the production of hypoxia-inducible factors and heat-shock proteins. Moreover, it was shown that extreme environments could also interact with the genome; in fact, epigenetics appears to play a major role in extreme environments and exercise, especially when changes in oxygen partial pressure are involved.

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2012 tammikuuta 1
P-1359 - The impact of foot reexology on sleep induction in patients suering from sleeping disorders
Véron R, Balestra C, Berlémont C, Lanquart JP & Jurysta F.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to test the impact of foot reflexology (FR) on sleep architecture in patients suffering from sleeping disorders. Aims: Try to improve sleep quality in patients with sleep disorders using the foot reflexology.

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2011 kesäkuuta 15
Passive flooding of paranasal sinuses and middle ears as a method of equalisation in extreme breath-hold diving
Germonpré P, Balestra C, Musimu P.

Breath-hold diving is both a recreational activity, performed by thousands of enthusiasts in Europe, and a high-performance competitive sport. Several 'disciplines' exist, of which the 'no-limits' category is the most spectacular: using a specially designed heavy 'sled,' divers descend to extreme depths on a cable, and then reascend using an inflatable balloon, on a single breath. The current world record for un-assisted descent stands at more than 200 m of depth. Equalising air pressure in the paranasal sinuses and middle-ear cavities is a necessity during descent to avoid barotraumas. However, this requires active insufflations of precious air, which is thus unavailable in the pulmonary system. The authors describe a diver who, by training, is capable of allowing passive flooding of the sinuses and middle ear with (sea) water during descent, by suppressing protective (parasympathetic) reflexes during this process. Using this technique, he performed a series of extreme-depth breath-hold dives in June 2005, descending to 209 m of sea water on one breath of air.

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2011 kesäkuuta 2
Passive flooding of paranasal sinuses and middle ears as a method of equalisation in extreme breath-hold diving
Germonpré P, Balestra C, Musimu P.

Breath-hold diving is both a recreational activity, performed by thousands of enthusiasts in Europe, and a high-performance competitive sport. Several 'disciplines' exist, of which the 'no-limits' category is the most spectacular: using a specially designed heavy 'sled,' divers descend to extreme depths on a cable, and then reascend using an inflatable balloon, on a single breath. The current world record for un-assisted descent stands at more than 200 m of depth. Equalising air pressure in the paranasal sinuses and middle-ear cavities is a necessity during descent to avoid barotraumas. However, this requires active insufflations of precious air, which is thus unavailable in the pulmonary system. The authors describe a diver who, by training, is capable of allowing passive flooding of the sinuses and middle ear with (sea) water during descent, by suppressing protective (parasympathetic) reflexes during this process. Using this technique, he performed a series of extreme-depth breath-hold dives in June 2005, descending to 209 m of sea water on one breath of air.

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