Diving after myocardial infarction

Question:
I suffered an MI in March 1998. I was employed as professional air crew, a Flight Engineer, with a Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) class 1 medical. I had no symptoms prior to the MI and no high risk conditions. I was fit, a non-smoker, reasonable weight for height, acceptable cholesterol level, reasonable blood pressure and subject to annual medical including ECG. I re-gained a full class 1 CAA medical in October 1998 and continued to work to my compulsory retirement age of 55 years in September 1999. My diving medical was covered by the CAA medical, including stress ECG, advise from the British Airways Medical Service and from discussions with DAN at Duke University.
The situation has now changed. I intend to extend my diving activity and have passed the British HSE medical for professional diving. The problem is that my diving physician has imposed restrictions on my HSE and PADI medical certificates. Those restrictions are a maximum depth of 30 meters and no decompression diving. Your medical advisor at the dive show express a view that if a diver was fit to dive, had passed the exercise ECG with no additional symptoms using the Bruce protocol to level 4 (12 minutes), and had an angiogram that showed no other abnormalities then there was no logical medical reason to impose depth or decompression limits.
If this is still your opinion I would be grateful if you could let me have an indication of that view in writing as a further opinion in my appeal to have the restrictions removed. I have a Master Suba Diver course booked for 24 April 2000.

Answer:
Following a Myocardial Infarction, return to diving may be possible if the individual is found, after an appropriate recovery period, on examination to have normal cardiac function and can pass a stress test up to the level of 13METHS.
A healthy lifestyle is also a favourable point.
The HSE and specific commercial organisations may have specific lists of contraindications which will affect fitness to dive certification for people under their umbrella. However, unless other factors are involved, at face value there seems no logic in applying a depth restriction to such a case.